Cane Corso Breed

GENERAL

The Cane Corso is a dominant guardian breed that requires an assertive, confident owner.

Smart, trainable, and noble of bearing; assertive and confident, Corsi are unrivaled protectors.

They are intelligent, affectionate, majestic and are easily trained. As a large and athletic breed, they need a lot of exercise. For this breed to be a well-balanced member of society, he needs extensive socialization and training from an early age. He does not do well crated all day and should have a fenced in yard for adequate exercise. They are affectionate to their owner and bond closely with children and family. The Corso requires substantial time invested and owners with an understanding of dog hierarchy.

GENERAL APPEARANCE

They are an ancient Italian breed medium-large size Molossus Dog. Sturdy, with a strong skeleton. Muscular and athletic, it moves with considerable ease and elegance.

The coat is short, stiff, shiny, adherent and dense with a light undercoat that becomes thicker in cold weather.

As a large breed, males weigh between 99-110 lbs , while females are between 88-100 lbs. Males are usually 24-28 inches tall (measured from the ground to their shoulder blades), while females stand at 23-26 inches high.

HISTORY

The Cane Corso is the direct ancestor is the “Canis Pugnax” (the old Roman Molossian) of which it is the light version employed in the hunting of large wild animals and also as an “auxiliary warrior” in battles. They are close relatives of the Neopolatin Mastiff; however, they predate their cousins, the Neopolitan Mastiff.

For years they has been a precious companion of the Italic populations.

Their name derives from the Latin “Cohors” which means “Guardian”, “Protector.”

Employed as property, cattle and personal watchdog besides being used for hunting of difficult game such as the wild boar too.

In the past this breed was common all over Italy. In the recent past they have found an excellent preservation area in Southern Italy, especially in Puglia, Lucania and Sannio.

Sources: AKC.org & Wikipedia